Coral reefs are better off because of you.

This past year brought tough news for coral reefs—several climate change reports shared discouraging new information about what their future holds. But here’s the good news: corals CAN adapt to climate change, and because of you, they’re in a better position to do so.

29

million gallons of raw sewage were kept off the Mesoamerican Reef by your donation

25

tons of sediment were prevented from smothering Maui’s coral reefs because of your support

165%

biomass increase of the most harvested fish species in Tela, Honduras was because of you

Your continued support now leverages the small window of time we have left to save coral reefs.

You’ve seen the record-breaking heatwaves, the ever-growing storms, the mass extinctions.

As our planet warms, so do our oceans. And the best way to help corals survive those warming temperatures is to keep them healthy enough to adapt. When you give to the Coral Reef Alliance, you invest in a global strategy to keep corals healthy so they can survive climate change. And you keep entire communities that rely on their coral reefs afloat. Take a look back at all your donation accomplished this past year:

Coral bleaching in Hawaii

Uniting A Global Coral Bleaching Response Network

Coral bleaching events make headlines every year. And each year, bleaching events have become more frequent and severe. Take Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, for example: In the last five years, the reef has been hit by three record-breaking coral bleaching events—one in 2016, one in 2017 and another in 2020.   But the Allen Coral Atlas… Continue Reading →

Roatan coastline

Could Cleaner Water Mean Farewell for Coral Disease?

Lea esto en español When improperly treated sewage enters the marine environment, it can have devastating effects on a coral reef. Not only does it bring bacteria that can pose a threat to human health, but it also brings nutrients that fuel the growth of algae—a fierce competitor in the coral reef ecosystem. Algae compete… Continue Reading →

Working group meeting in Tela

Want to Protect Fisheries? Involve the Community.

Lea esto en español During a recent interview, Dr. Antonella Rivera, CORAL’s Principal Investigator in Honduras, perfectly summed up our approach to conservation: “If we really want to make a difference with science, we have to involve the people who are most affected.” People and communities are always at the forefront of our work to… Continue Reading →

Screen shot of the Allen Coral Atlas

CORAL Partners with Allen Coral Atlas

We’re incredibly excited to announce that we just received a new $850,000, three-year grant from the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation to support facilitating a global network to monitor coral bleaching and water quality threat alerts from the Allen Coral Atlas. A new partner of ours, the Atlas is a collaboration of scientists and researchers… Continue Reading →

Credit: Antonio Busiello

The beauty of coral reefs and the sea life they attract is breathtaking. It is essential to protect and preserve coral reefs, now more than ever, in the face of climate change.

Margaret A. Cotoia, donor since 1999

Support CORAL

Our work ensuring coral reefs survive climate change wouldn’t be possible without your support. Give today to help save coral reefs.

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